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Videoguys’ DIY 11: How to Build an Affordable Editing & Streaming Workstation with Balanced Components for the Best Performance

Videoguys DIY 11

For more than 10 years Videoguys.com, one of the world’s leading resellers of video editing and production equipment, has been publishing DIY articles as a service to customers. These guides will help you choose the best system components for your non-linear editing workstation.

Our new tech guy, Scott Smith, has completed our much anticipated new DIY11 build. It’s a screamer! The goal was to put together a top notch NLE & Streaming machine for around $1,500. Scott did the research and the build is complete and tested. Holy smokes! This machine runs lightning fast, the case is whisper quiet and the NLE performance is superb. Great job Scott!

Videoguys’ DIY 11 Build

ASUS Z97-PRO Motherboard (or Asus Z97-A/USB3.1) $202.99
Intel 4790k i7 Quad-Core $339.99
G.SKILL Ripjaw DDR3 1600 16GB Set (2x8GB) $79.99
ASUS GTX970 Graphics Card with 4GB memory and 1,664 CUDA cores $329.99
Crucial M500 240GB SSD Boot Drive $114.99
Phanteks Enthoo Pro Case $99.99
Corsair HX750i Power Supply $119.99
Noctua NH-D14 Cooler $74.99
Pioneer BDR-209 Internal Blu-ray Disc/DVD/CD Writer $75.00
at Videoguys.com
Microsoft Win 7 Pro or Windows 10 64-Bit OS $139.99
ASUS ThunerboltEX II
PCIe Card
$70.00
Grand Total: $1,647.91
*prices based on mid-March, 2015 online prices. Prices subject to change.

Balance Baby!

The most important thing to keep in mind when purchasing a new computer for video editing; whether you edit with Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere, Grass Valley Edius or Sony Vegas Pro; is balance.  The performance will only be as good as the weakest link in the chain. For video editing the chain has 4 key links – motherboard, CPU, GPU and RAM.  If either of these four points is below the other 3, you will bring down the overall NLE performance of the workstation. In addition, if one of the components is significantly higher performing than the other three you are not only wasting money on it, you may actually get poorer performance and the super fast component can create bottlenecks in other areas.

Scott picked the ASUS Z97-PRO motherboard with Thunderbolt II, based on the latest Haswell chipset. There are actually two flavors of this motherboard available. The ASUS Z97-PRO (WiFi ac) or the non WiFi version. The version without Wifi is certainly less expensive and works exactly the same in all other aspects. We spent about $40 more to get the motherboard with WiFi because we need the connectivity.  If you only use wired networking in your edit suite, you can save the money while ASUS is blowing out the non WiFi model. We recommend these two articles which helped us choose our motherboard, along with real user feedback found on Newegg.com

We also had a little hiccup with the graphics card. Initially we were going to go with a GTX760 card. – a tried & true, proven performer. Unfortunately this series has reached the end of the line, and we had to find a new replacement.  We picked the GTX970 series, packed with 4GB of RAM and 1,664 CUDA cores.  While we saw some comments and concerns posted about this card online, we did not run into any issues with it at all.  The GTX970 GPU is our new go to recommendation for DIY workstations.

I’m, going to kick the article over to Scott now. He’s going to go over each component in more details. Enjoy the article, watch the video and have fun editing!

Let’s start with the 4 key components:

Motherboard
ASUS Z97-PRO

The Z97 is a more refined version of the previous Z87 platform featured in our last DIY build. While the core functionality of the Z97 is similar to the Z87, it also has support for SATA Express and Mobile SATA (aka M.2). Also, it has been noted unofficially that many Z97 based boards now feature 2 internal USB 3 headers instead of 1; however, this will vary by manufacturer. Despite these benefits, the biggest reason to go with a Z97 is that you will also be able to an upgraded Broadwell chipset should you choose to do so in the future.
April ’16 Update: Asus Z97-Pro motherboards are no longer available. We are recommending the Asus Z97-A/USB 3.1 as a solid replacement for around $150

GPU
GTX970

While a well-built machine must be balanced, there is no doubt that the graphics card is extremely important when it comes to the performance of your NLE build. We only recommend cards based off of NVIDIA graphics chipsets for both their performance and optimization within Adobe and Avid. Adobe has optimized all of their software to take advantage of NVIDIA’s CUDA technology. DIY 11 features a GeForce GTX970 with 4GB of dedicated graphics memory and 1,664 CUDA cores.

CPU
Intel 4790K
Quad Core i7

Intel has hit a homerun with their new 4790k i7 chip, it packs massive performance at a great price, even with it being only quad core. It comes clocked at an incredible 4GHz with a boost frequency of 4.4GHz, so it’s safe to say that you can push 4.4GHz out of this processor at all times using the simple overclocking tools in the ASUS Z97-PRO board’s EFI BIOS.

Videoguys Tech Note: Intel Xeon Processors are considered the top choice for professional content creators and production teams who need a workhorse for hours of daily operation. We chose the Asus motherboard and i7 for the lower cost and excellent value and know it will be more than reliable providing the power necessary to edit HD video. Going with a Xeon would cost a lot more and would also mean upgrading the motherboard and RAM to Xeon compatible models that could add hundreds of dollars to the cost of the build. When we looked at the cost of a DIY Xeon workstation we concluded that an HP Z Workstation with 3/3/3 year warranty is a far better investment!

RAM

We have been recommending G.SKILL RAM for years and have been very happy with its performance on this build as well as previous builds. As a rule of thumb, Videoguys now recommends 3GB of RAM per CPU Core.  Since RAM comes in 4,8 or 16GB sticks that comes to 12GB for a Quad core, 16GB for a Hex core, 24GB for an 8-core etc..  We decided to go with 16GB for this build which is what we consider the new minimum for people who want to do HD editing in native compressions like H.264.

Videoguys Tech Note: RAM prices can fluctuate greatly, especially depending on how you choose to achieve the total RAM goal. For example, using 4×4 to get to 16GB might sometimes be cheaper than using 2×8 or it can be the other way around. If you find a good deal on a 32GB RAM set (which has to be a 4x8GB on this build, since our board only has 4 RAM slots) we recommend you purchase it, you won’t regret it.

…and now, the rest of the components that make up Videoguys’ DIY 11

SSD Boot Drive

Solid State Drives are becoming more and more popular in all different forms, from a true fully solid state (no moving parts) drive to new “hybrid” drives that contain both solid state storage and traditional spinning platters. Our build features a 240GB Crucial Solid State boot drive. We also recommend SSDs from Intel & Samsung. You need to make sure you select an SSD from the premium performance series, not the lower cost options. These premium SSDs are far more reliable and faster. Running a solid state for your operating system (for which we still recommend Windows 7 Pro) and applications will greatly improve boot time of the machine and application performance. For your editing/raw footage storage we suggest hooking up a G-RAID with Thunderbolt for maximum throughput.

Thunderbolt 2

Enthusiasm for thunderbolt has not slowed down, especially with G-Technology releasing more and more drive options using the technology.

Thunderbolt allows you to attach an external 4, 6 or 8 bay storage solution and get sustained throughput comparable to an external RAID controller card like an ATTO R680 or Highpoint RocketRAID 4522. These RAID controllers cost around a thousand bucks and require special drivers that may be challenging to set up. External Thunderbolt RAIDs are very easy to set-up. All you have to do is plug it in, format and go. You can even daisy chain multiple Thunderbolt drives. Blazing fast Thunderbolt transfer speeds also mean that you can copy your data from your camcorder or DSLR or GoPro much faster. And we know, the faster you can copy the footage, the sooner you can start editing!

Thunderbolt Video Storage

Videoguys recommends G-Tech external drives above all others! G-Tech uses only the highest quality 7200RPM drives from HGST. In fact all of our G-Tech RAID solutions use HGST Enterprise class drives. These drives are engineered for the most rigorous 24/7 environments. Numerous independent tests have determined that HGST Enterprise drives are the most reliable in the industry. G-Tech matches this incredible reliability and performance with sleek, sexy styling to deliver the best external drive solutions in the industry for video, photo and audio content. Whatever your workflows are, G-Tech & Videoguys have a solution that will meet your needs and budget.

Check out the G-Technology Thunderbolt storage solutions:

g-drive ev atc G-DOCK Thunderbolt G-RAID USB 3 g-raid thunderbolt 2
G-DRIVE ev ATC

Is an all-terrain drive solution that shields a high quality, lightweight, removable GDRIVE ev RaW USB hard drive.

Starting at:
$129.95

G-DOCK ev Thunderbolt Enclosure

An Expandable Storage Solution for Two Hot-Swappable Hard Drives. (Drives sold separately).

$299.95

G-RAID with USB 3.0

Removable Dual-Drive Storage System with USB 3.0 interface, RAID 0, 1 or JBOD, and up to 400MB/s transfer rates.

Starting at:
$529.95

G-RAID with Thunderbolt 2 and USB 3

GRAID with dual Thunderbolt™ 2 and USB 3.0 ports, up to 480MB/s transfer rates.

Starting at:
$599.95

 

GSPEEDST-12TB

G-SPEED Studio RAID-5 solution with  Thunderbolt 2
We Stocked up on G-SPEED Studio Solutions at incredible prices with incredible savings of up to $1,350!!!

G-SPEED Studio includes four removeable 3TB drives in a 4-bay housing that can easily be configured in RAID-5 to combine fast transfer speeds with data protection. In RAID-5 one drive will index data allowing your information to be restored in case of a drive failure. Recommended for all video professionals.

GSPEEDST-12TB
$1,999.95
$899.95

buy now

GSPEEDST-16TB
$2,299.95
$1,199.95

buy now

GSPEEDST-24TB
$2,899.95
$1,749.95

buy now

GSPEEDST-32TB
$3,599.95
$2,249.95

buy now

 

Phantek Enthoo Pro Case

We decided to try out a new case for this build and I must say this it was a pleasant surprise. This Phanteks case features 6 easily removable drive holders that can accommodate full size drives or SSD’s. On top of that it includes 2 incredibly quiet fans with their own power distribution block so you do not need to use two fan power ports on your Z97 board. The cable management in this case is simply incredible, it has a ton of different grommet locations to get cables where you need them without being seen and built in tie downs on the rear of the case.  It also comes with plenty of spare screws in a nice plastic organizer which is a cool bonus. From a tech standpoint it has two front USB 3 ports, two USB 2 ports, one headphone jack and one microphone jack. It looks sleek, stays cool, and doesn’t leave a mess of wires visible. What more could you ask for?

Performance

All of this talk is great, but what really matters is how this computer performs. We did some exports and the results were pretty impressive. DIY11’s performance blew us away! We rendered out a 40 minute 1080p AVCHD project with some minor effects in just 11 minutes! Our test 27” iMac with an i7 Processor, 16GB of RAM, and AMD graphics did it in about 40 minutes.  This machine was even used to edit and render out the video for this very DIY build! As for heat, well, this computer is one cool cucumber. We saw temperatures around 60 degrees Celsius under 100% load using CPU testing software.


Quad core XEON HP z440 Workstations
Starting at $2,999.00
Octo core XEON HP z640 Workstations
Starting at $3,750.00
Dual Hex & Octo Core XEON
HP z840 Workstations
Starting at $4,999.00

Videoguys’ DIY 11 vs HP zWorkstations

While we do offer our DIY guide and recommendations, we do not sell these systems or their components. We purchase our parts from on line stores like newegg.com or tigerdirect.com just like you.

Videoguys does have HP Z workstations available for sale. Scott, Gary and the other techs that helped build DIY11 actually work with HP, Adobe & Avid to create Videoguys Tech Select configurations which are optimized to deliver the highest possible NLE performance bang for your buck.  We can also custom configure an HP Z workstation to meet your specific needs and budget.

HP Z workstations do have some key benefits over the DIY machine. The Z is a turnkey workstation class solution, all of the parts used are of a higher level meant for constant usage and higher stress loads. Our HP Z workstations come with a 3/3/3 parts, labor, and onsite warranty. As far as hardware goes you are looking at a Xeon server-class processor vs an i7 desktop level processor in the DIY and the new DDR4 memory standard vs DDR3 in the DIY.  HP Workstations also use Quadro based graphics cards vs the gamer cards we use in our DIY builds. While the gamer cards give you more CUDA processing bang for the buck, Quadro cards deliver an added level of stability and reliability that go beyond gamer cards. They are designed, built and optimized for Content Creators.  While you can’t run a Xeon processor or DDR4 memory in our DY11 build, you can upgrade to a Quadro card if you’d like.

 

Videoguys DIY 11

For more than 10 years Videoguys.com, one of the world’s leading resellers of video editing and production equipment, has been publishing DIY articles as a service to customers. These guides will help you choose the best system components for your non-linear editing workstation.

Our new tech guy, Scott Smith, has completed our much anticipated new DIY11 build. It’s a screamer! The goal was to put together a top notch NLE & Streaming machine for around $1,500. Scott did the research and the build is complete and tested. Holy smokes! This machine runs lightning fast, the case is whisper quiet and the NLE performance is superb. Great job Scott!

Videoguys’ DIY 11 Build

ASUS Z97-PRO Motherboard (or Asus Z97-A/USB3.1) $202.99
Intel 4790k i7 Quad-Core $339.99
G.SKILL Ripjaw DDR3 1600 16GB Set (2x8GB) $79.99
ASUS GTX970 Graphics Card with 4GB memory and 1,664 CUDA cores $329.99
Crucial M500 240GB SSD Boot Drive $114.99
Phanteks Enthoo Pro Case $99.99
Corsair HX750i Power Supply $119.99
Noctua NH-D14 Cooler $74.99
Pioneer BDR-209 Internal Blu-ray Disc/DVD/CD Writer $75.00
at Videoguys.com
Microsoft Win 7 Pro or Windows 10 64-Bit OS $139.99
ASUS ThunerboltEX II
PCIe Card
$70.00
Grand Total: $1,647.91
*prices based on mid-March, 2015 online prices. Prices subject to change.

Balance Baby!

The most important thing to keep in mind when purchasing a new computer for video editing; whether you edit with Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere, Grass Valley Edius or Sony Vegas Pro; is balance.  The performance will only be as good as the weakest link in the chain. For video editing the chain has 4 key links – motherboard, CPU, GPU and RAM.  If either of these four points is below the other 3, you will bring down the overall NLE performance of the workstation. In addition, if one of the components is significantly higher performing than the other three you are not only wasting money on it, you may actually get poorer performance and the super fast component can create bottlenecks in other areas.

Scott picked the ASUS Z97-PRO motherboard with Thunderbolt II, based on the latest Haswell chipset. There are actually two flavors of this motherboard available. The ASUS Z97-PRO (WiFi ac) or the non WiFi version. The version without Wifi is certainly less expensive and works exactly the same in all other aspects. We spent about $40 more to get the motherboard with WiFi because we need the connectivity.  If you only use wired networking in your edit suite, you can save the money while ASUS is blowing out the non WiFi model. We recommend these two articles which helped us choose our motherboard, along with real user feedback found on Newegg.com

We also had a little hiccup with the graphics card. Initially we were going to go with a GTX760 card. – a tried & true, proven performer. Unfortunately this series has reached the end of the line, and we had to find a new replacement.  We picked the GTX970 series, packed with 4GB of RAM and 1,664 CUDA cores.  While we saw some comments and concerns posted about this card online, we did not run into any issues with it at all.  The GTX970 GPU is our new go to recommendation for DIY workstations.

I’m, going to kick the article over to Scott now. He’s going to go over each component in more details. Enjoy the article, watch the video and have fun editing!

Let’s start with the 4 key components:

Motherboard
ASUS Z97-PRO

The Z97 is a more refined version of the previous Z87 platform featured in our last DIY build. While the core functionality of the Z97 is similar to the Z87, it also has support for SATA Express and Mobile SATA (aka M.2). Also, it has been noted unofficially that many Z97 based boards now feature 2 internal USB 3 headers instead of 1; however, this will vary by manufacturer. Despite these benefits, the biggest reason to go with a Z97 is that you will also be able to an upgraded Broadwell chipset should you choose to do so in the future.
April ’16 Update: Asus Z97-Pro motherboards are no longer available. We are recommending the Asus Z97-A/USB 3.1 as a solid replacement for around $150

GPU
GTX970

While a well-built machine must be balanced, there is no doubt that the graphics card is extremely important when it comes to the performance of your NLE build. We only recommend cards based off of NVIDIA graphics chipsets for both their performance and optimization within Adobe and Avid. Adobe has optimized all of their software to take advantage of NVIDIA’s CUDA technology. DIY 11 features a GeForce GTX970 with 4GB of dedicated graphics memory and 1,664 CUDA cores.

CPU
Intel 4790K
Quad Core i7

Intel has hit a homerun with their new 4790k i7 chip, it packs massive performance at a great price, even with it being only quad core. It comes clocked at an incredible 4GHz with a boost frequency of 4.4GHz, so it’s safe to say that you can push 4.4GHz out of this processor at all times using the simple overclocking tools in the ASUS Z97-PRO board’s EFI BIOS.

Videoguys Tech Note: Intel Xeon Processors are considered the top choice for professional content creators and production teams who need a workhorse for hours of daily operation. We chose the Asus motherboard and i7 for the lower cost and excellent value and know it will be more than reliable providing the power necessary to edit HD video. Going with a Xeon would cost a lot more and would also mean upgrading the motherboard and RAM to Xeon compatible models that could add hundreds of dollars to the cost of the build. When we looked at the cost of a DIY Xeon workstation we concluded that an HP Z Workstation with 3/3/3 year warranty is a far better investment!

RAM

We have been recommending G.SKILL RAM for years and have been very happy with its performance on this build as well as previous builds. As a rule of thumb, Videoguys now recommends 3GB of RAM per CPU Core.  Since RAM comes in 4,8 or 16GB sticks that comes to 12GB for a Quad core, 16GB for a Hex core, 24GB for an 8-core etc..  We decided to go with 16GB for this build which is what we consider the new minimum for people who want to do HD editing in native compressions like H.264.

Videoguys Tech Note: RAM prices can fluctuate greatly, especially depending on how you choose to achieve the total RAM goal. For example, using 4×4 to get to 16GB might sometimes be cheaper than using 2×8 or it can be the other way around. If you find a good deal on a 32GB RAM set (which has to be a 4x8GB on this build, since our board only has 4 RAM slots) we recommend you purchase it, you won’t regret it.

…and now, the rest of the components that make up Videoguys’ DIY 11

SSD Boot Drive

Solid State Drives are becoming more and more popular in all different forms, from a true fully solid state (no moving parts) drive to new “hybrid” drives that contain both solid state storage and traditional spinning platters. Our build features a 240GB Crucial Solid State boot drive. We also recommend SSDs from Intel & Samsung. You need to make sure you select an SSD from the premium performance series, not the lower cost options. These premium SSDs are far more reliable and faster. Running a solid state for your operating system (for which we still recommend Windows 7 Pro) and applications will greatly improve boot time of the machine and application performance. For your editing/raw footage storage we suggest hooking up a G-RAID with Thunderbolt for maximum throughput.

Thunderbolt 2

Enthusiasm for thunderbolt has not slowed down, especially with G-Technology releasing more and more drive options using the technology.

Thunderbolt allows you to attach an external 4, 6 or 8 bay storage solution and get sustained throughput comparable to an external RAID controller card like an ATTO R680 or Highpoint RocketRAID 4522. These RAID controllers cost around a thousand bucks and require special drivers that may be challenging to set up. External Thunderbolt RAIDs are very easy to set-up. All you have to do is plug it in, format and go. You can even daisy chain multiple Thunderbolt drives. Blazing fast Thunderbolt transfer speeds also mean that you can copy your data from your camcorder or DSLR or GoPro much faster. And we know, the faster you can copy the footage, the sooner you can start editing!

Thunderbolt Video Storage

Videoguys recommends G-Tech external drives above all others! G-Tech uses only the highest quality 7200RPM drives from HGST. In fact all of our G-Tech RAID solutions use HGST Enterprise class drives. These drives are engineered for the most rigorous 24/7 environments. Numerous independent tests have determined that HGST Enterprise drives are the most reliable in the industry. G-Tech matches this incredible reliability and performance with sleek, sexy styling to deliver the best external drive solutions in the industry for video, photo and audio content. Whatever your workflows are, G-Tech & Videoguys have a solution that will meet your needs and budget.

Check out the G-Technology Thunderbolt storage solutions:

g-drive ev atc G-DOCK Thunderbolt G-RAID USB 3 g-raid thunderbolt 2
G-DRIVE ev ATC

Is an all-terrain drive solution that shields a high quality, lightweight, removable GDRIVE ev RaW USB hard drive.

Starting at:
$129.95

G-DOCK ev Thunderbolt Enclosure

An Expandable Storage Solution for Two Hot-Swappable Hard Drives. (Drives sold separately).

$299.95

G-RAID with USB 3.0

Removable Dual-Drive Storage System with USB 3.0 interface, RAID 0, 1 or JBOD, and up to 400MB/s transfer rates.

Starting at:
$529.95

G-RAID with Thunderbolt 2 and USB 3

GRAID with dual Thunderbolt™ 2 and USB 3.0 ports, up to 480MB/s transfer rates.

Starting at:
$599.95

 

GSPEEDST-12TB

G-SPEED Studio RAID-5 solution with  Thunderbolt 2
We Stocked up on G-SPEED Studio Solutions at incredible prices with incredible savings of up to $1,350!!!

G-SPEED Studio includes four removeable 3TB drives in a 4-bay housing that can easily be configured in RAID-5 to combine fast transfer speeds with data protection. In RAID-5 one drive will index data allowing your information to be restored in case of a drive failure. Recommended for all video professionals.

GSPEEDST-12TB
$1,999.95
$899.95

buy now

GSPEEDST-16TB
$2,299.95
$1,199.95

buy now

GSPEEDST-24TB
$2,899.95
$1,749.95

buy now

GSPEEDST-32TB
$3,599.95
$2,249.95

buy now

 

Phantek Enthoo Pro Case

We decided to try out a new case for this build and I must say this it was a pleasant surprise. This Phanteks case features 6 easily removable drive holders that can accommodate full size drives or SSD’s. On top of that it includes 2 incredibly quiet fans with their own power distribution block so you do not need to use two fan power ports on your Z97 board. The cable management in this case is simply incredible, it has a ton of different grommet locations to get cables where you need them without being seen and built in tie downs on the rear of the case.  It also comes with plenty of spare screws in a nice plastic organizer which is a cool bonus. From a tech standpoint it has two front USB 3 ports, two USB 2 ports, one headphone jack and one microphone jack. It looks sleek, stays cool, and doesn’t leave a mess of wires visible. What more could you ask for?

Performance

All of this talk is great, but what really matters is how this computer performs. We did some exports and the results were pretty impressive. DIY11’s performance blew us away! We rendered out a 40 minute 1080p AVCHD project with some minor effects in just 11 minutes! Our test 27” iMac with an i7 Processor, 16GB of RAM, and AMD graphics did it in about 40 minutes.  This machine was even used to edit and render out the video for this very DIY build! As for heat, well, this computer is one cool cucumber. We saw temperatures around 60 degrees Celsius under 100% load using CPU testing software.


Quad core XEON HP z440 Workstations
Starting at $2,999.00
Octo core XEON HP z640 Workstations
Starting at $3,750.00
Dual Hex & Octo Core XEON
HP z840 Workstations
Starting at $4,999.00

Videoguys’ DIY 11 vs HP zWorkstations

While we do offer our DIY guide and recommendations, we do not sell these systems or their components. We purchase our parts from on line stores like newegg.com or tigerdirect.com just like you.

Videoguys does have HP Z workstations available for sale. Scott, Gary and the other techs that helped build DIY11 actually work with HP, Adobe & Avid to create Videoguys Tech Select configurations which are optimized to deliver the highest possible NLE performance bang for your buck.  We can also custom configure an HP Z workstation to meet your specific needs and budget.

HP Z workstations do have some key benefits over the DIY machine. The Z is a turnkey workstation class solution, all of the parts used are of a higher level meant for constant usage and higher stress loads. Our HP Z workstations come with a 3/3/3 parts, labor, and onsite warranty. As far as hardware goes you are looking at a Xeon server-class processor vs an i7 desktop level processor in the DIY and the new DDR4 memory standard vs DDR3 in the DIY.  HP Workstations also use Quadro based graphics cards vs the gamer cards we use in our DIY builds. While the gamer cards give you more CUDA processing bang for the buck, Quadro cards deliver an added level of stability and reliability that go beyond gamer cards. They are designed, built and optimized for Content Creators.  While you can’t run a Xeon processor or DDR4 memory in our DY11 build, you can upgrade to a Quadro card if you’d like.

 

Tags: , , , ,

By Gary, March 20, 2015
  • Brad

    Thank you for putting together this article. I have a few questions that I was hoping you can help answer. I am using Premiere Pro and a bit of After Effects.

    I did like it in past DIY editions when you had a premium option as well. I was previously looking at building a system with Asus X99 Deluxe Motherboard and Intel i7 5820k processor and a change to DDR4 memory.
    1) Do you think that this would be a good premium system with these changes?
    2) Do you think there would be a noticeable jump in performance for the extra cost compared to DIY11?

    I had been reading information about issues with the GTX970 on how the last .5Gb in the 4GB card is treated differently/slower which causes issues for editors and gamers due to the slower speed that occurs after 3.5GB is in use.
    3) Is this a concern for our purposes?
    4) Would the GTX980 be better which does not have this limitation and is a true 4GB card or do you think I wouldn’t experience much difference?
    5) I also read that CUDA in Premiere is not fully supported by the newer Nvidia cards such as the gtx970/980 in a similar way that the older cards were… possibly this was fixed in a recent update or it may still be an issue?

    Thanks in advance for your comments.

    • X99 certainly is the bleeding edge of technology, and there are benefits, but parts costs on X99 builds can get very high very quickly, our new Tech Select HP builds are X99 based and feature DDR4 memory so if you are considering going X99 take a look at them, they are great value for your money.

      We have not had any issues with the GTX970 regarding the 3.5/.5GB issue, which we knew about going in. Premiere pretty much is always using all of the memory available so you are not really ever stuck in the .5GB mode. We currently do have CUDA enabled and working thru the cuda_supported_cards.txt trick.

      • Brad

        Thanks for the info. I noticed that the list at the top shows an Asus GTX970 but a photo further down and box in the video shows EVGA. Is there a recommended brand to use? I note several reviews specific to the EVGA brand (and not to the ASUS brand) re coil whine (but unsure if that issue has been recently fixed).

        Secondly there are a bunch of G.SKILL Ripjaw memory on newegg. Is it possible to give further specs regarding this memory so I know which one to order.

        • Funny enough we actually went with the EVGA because we heard about coil whine issues on the ASUS. I can confirm that (at least our unit) has no coil whine. As far as the memory goes here is the model # for what we ordered: F3-12800CL10D-16GBXL

    • Keith Dera

      I’m going down this road too, pushing the DIY11 envelope a bit. I was all set to go with the I7-4790 / ASUS Z97 Pro/WiFI but opted to the I7-5820K (Corsair liquid cooled) / ASUS X99-Pro/WIFI / Crucial 16GB (2×8) DDR4-2133 for later planned obsolescence. Can you offer the benchmarks used to determine where my bottlenecks may be. I’m planning on keeping my current ASUS GTX 670 graphics card.

    • dgpretzel

      I also will be editing 4k video (XAVC-S0 with PowerDirector 13. I observe that Mr. Bettan commented above, “Yes DIY11 will handle 4K, but it’s at the low end of the spectrum.” The ~$1,500 price point of DY11 is phenomenal. Another few hundred dollars to handle 4K video would still be phenomenal, and also well below the professional workstations, such as the HP Z series.

      Might anyone suggest one or two incremental improvements to beef up DY11 for 4K video editing, and still keep below approximately $2K.

      Thank you.

      DG

      P.S. You could call it “DY11 Prime” or “DY11+” or “DY11-4K”

  • Jose Antonio Sarmento

    I am presently using your DIY8 for editing HD video with great success (Thanks a million!) and now need to edit 4k video from Sony A7s/Atomos Shogun. Will DIY11 do the trick? Any additional improvement I should consider?
    Not sure how I’d hook up a GTechnology Thunderbolt drive to the computer. Are there Thunderbolt ports available from the motherboard? Sory my ignorance, not a tech person. But by following your suggestions that has never been a problem for me!
    I used to have a third display for video previewing in the past using a Matrox solution, is there a way to get a 3rd monitor from your DIY11 build? (2 monitors for video editing and one for simultaneous display of the program output on a 4k monitor).
    Thanks again for your much appreciated help. If your guides were rock music you’d be Clapton in my humble opinion!

    Best regards,
    Jose A Sarmento

    • Yes DIY11 will handle 4K, but it’s at the low end of the spectrum. For real 4K work we’re recommending our $5K HP z840 config.
      You can use a Matrox MXO2LE for I/O from the timeline. If you just need HDMI the MXO2 Mini will do the trick. For 4K, get a Aja Kona4 or Io4K hardware.

  • Manuel Morales

    Hello and thanks for sharing your knowledge with us. I edit Pro res HD with avid media composer 8,
    I want to build a system to make my renders and exporting faster. My actual PC render my 29 minutes timeline in 20 minutes then, It takes almost 40 minutes to export a dnx 145 file.
    Have you test DIY 11 with media composer?
    Do you think this built could help me to get faster exporting and render?

    thanks in advance for you help.

    • We have not used Media Composer on DIY 11 yet, but if you provide me with your current system’s spec’s I will be able to tell you whether or not you will see an improvement.

      • Manuel Morales

        Thanks Scott for your fast reply.

        I built a system with

        intel core i7 3960x extreme edition processor

        motherboard ASUSTeK COMPUTER INC. P9X79 LE

        graphic card NVIDIA Quadro K4000

        ram 64 gb

        8 x 8,192 MB Crucial Technology DDR3 @ 800 MHz

        solid state drive samsung 850 pro

        os 64-bit Windows 7 (6.1.7601)

        I have used novabech to benchmark my built and it gives me around 1455

        do you think i can improve with another DIY or it would be better to buy a hp or dell.
        i am client of videoguys is it possible to contact you by phone?
        thanks

        • I will run a novabench on our machine as a comparison for you. As for HP vs DIY that is mainly a matter of cost and the understanding that the HP is a workstation-class machine built using higher end parts. All of our HP’s also feature the newer Intel architecture that supports DDR4 memory. You can feel free to reach us by phone at anytime at 800-323-2325.

  • Joseph Landeene

    Which style of the EVGA card? ACX 2.0, FTW, FTW+ etc

  • Toon

    This is ‘old’ stuff. why not build with with Haswell E-platform, X99-chipsets and Core i7-5960X processor? Not really economic but a big jump ahead in (render)speed. 8 cores, 16 hyperthread, Twice as much as 4790K.

    • It’s not really “old”, it has just reached a maturity point where the kinks are worked out and things work properly, board firmwares have been updated several times, etc. X99 is the bleeding edge and we like to see technologies mature before recommending them. Also, when it comes to the DIY builds money is a huge factor. We found that it would cost more than double the price of this machine to go with an X99 based build, which easily puts you into the money for a great pre configured HP.

  • jsm1963

    Where can you get the wifi version of that motherboard for $162? Looks like an error in their numbers. The non-wifi version might be had for that price.

    • That price is for the non-wifi version, in the article we stated that we went with the wireless version for connectivity, however we are only recommending you purchase that if you need it. That is why the line item is named “ASUS Z97-PRO Motherboard” and not “ASUS Z97-PRO Wifi AC Motherboard”. Sorry for any confusion.

  • We went with the HX750 because we like Corsair and also wanted a fully modular power supply for a clean case with no extra wires dangling around. That price is for the non-wifi version, in the article we stated that we went with the wireless version for connectivity, however we are only recommending you purchase that if you need it. Good point on having an SSD media cache!

  • Chuck Smith

    Ditto on the mobo cost… I don’t see a ASUS Z97 PRO WiFi at under $200. Please clarify your cost posting.

    • That price is for the non-wifi version, in the article we stated that we went with the wireless version for connectivity, however we are only recommending you purchase that if you need it. That is why the line item on the price list is named “ASUS Z97-PRO Motherboard” and not “ASUS Z97-PRO Wifi AC Motherboard”. Sorry for any confusion.

  • Glad to hear it’s working well for you, Quick Sync definitely is helpful with EDIUS, but I just want to point out to our readers that EDIUS is the only NLE that takes advantage of this technology. Adobe and Avid do not.

    • Barry C

      As the majority of my workflow is 3D, I find that Power Director 13, in addition to Edius, can be quite useful in this regard. It is also optimized for Quick Sync. Power Director has a much cleaner deinterlacer when converting 1080 60i to 29.97p.

  • Needed a new workhorse for TV production and decided to give Scott’s DIY 11 build a shot. Couldn’t be happier. It probably took me a little longer to put together but worth it. Scott was right there to answer my questions..and so far this thing is quiet and cruising at warp speed. The only modification I made to the Asus MB was going 32 gig ram (4xdimm) which is allowed on this board. However you can’t fit the cooling stack on 4 sticks of ram so for now I’m seeing how it works with just the default processor fan and it seems to only have hit a max temp of 65 degrees. Not sure how this will affect things. I’m not sure how to get the extra cooling power with the 4 sticks. Thanks Scott for a fabulous build:)

    • Thanks for your feedback Scott, glad to hear everything worked out. You should be able to fit the ram under the cooler no problem if you went with the G.SKILL Ripjaw RAM. Shoot me some pictures of how you have everything installed in the case if you can. I tested fitting RAM under the cooler and did not have a problem.

  • Gary Ray

    It has been a long time since I built one of these. The only thing I am concerned with are the “Part numbers”. For the cooler: One part number is “Noctua NH-D14”. There also is a “Noctua NH-D14 SE2011”.
    Please bare with me. I have a couple of these questions.

    • The correct model is the NH-D14, not the SE2011. As for your questions, ask away!

    • I did make that mistake. I ordered the wrong one. I’ll see how the new one works with 4x 8gig ram sticks and report back.
      Other than that this this is my new friend:)

      • Great! Can’t wait to get your feedback once you have everything with the cooler sorted out.

  • Gary Ray

    The Crucial M500 240GB SSD has been the favored Solid State Drive (by the DIY 11 Builders). Apparently there is a new “B” series from Crucial. Any comments on the newcomer?
    Question: What is the favored 1TB (old style disc spinning platters, not SDD)? The WD brand seems to be popular.

    Question: I have always purchased a separate audio card with Coax digital feed to amps, etc. Can this ASUS Z97 come close to an independent card?

    • I am having trouble finding info on this “B” series that you’re referring to, can you please provide a link? If you happen to be talking about the M.2 that is an different kind of SSD, not a regular one. I am personally a fan of WD drives, but the HGST drives similar to those used in the G-Technology products are excellent.

      As for the audio card, the internal audio on this is similar to the internal audio on nearly any other board made in the past few years. I personally find it sufficient but a separate card can’t hurt anything if you want to go that route.

  • Can you please provide a link to this B series? I am having trouble finding info on it.

  • As for the RAM, I am having trouble finding a board that allows for more than 32GB. You might need to step up to X99, at which point you might consider looking into the HP z840, if you need that much power that computer will suit you. I am personally a big fan of Dell LED IPS monitors, they look amazing, I have two of them attached to my computer right now! I think the biggest difference is the graphics card. All of Apple’s GFX options for the iMac are lacking in my opinion.

  • Gary Ray
    • It is still readily available and for a great price. It is well reviewed and trusted, the new model barely has any information/reviews on it, which is why we went with the M500.

  • Gary Ray
  • Gary Ray
  • Gary Ray

    I am sorry for the repeated entries. I haven’t been doing well with Disqus.

  • secondguess

    Scott, thank you for the valuable DIY guide. As I trust your guide, I want to follow it as closely as possible, so here are a few questions:

    – I’ve noticed the two RAM cards were initially installed in slots A1 and B1, but after mounting the MB in the case, you moved them in two adjacent slots, or at least this is how it looks in the video. I understand this is not a standard configuration when you have only two memory cards. Is this how you wanted it?

    – Regarding the GPU, you said that you intended to go with ASUS GTX 970, but because of negative reviews about coil noise, you switched to the EVGA equivalent card. My research showed that both cards can have the coil noise. Would you still recommend the ASUS, or now, after testing the configuration you are strongly for EVGA.

  • Eddie B

    How will this build do with 4K? I don’t necessarily have to edit it in real time, but will it get cranky edited on Vegas Pro?

  • Gary Ray

    The PWM HUB is only connected to the front and the rear fans (2) of the Phanteks Enthoo. That leaves the NOCTUA NH-D14 cooler (2) fans for the mother board Intel Core i7 Processor. Two plug-ins with two processor fans. All good.

    The HD Audio cable needs to have a home. It starts from the front of the Phanteks and is hanging loose in the rear. Where does this plug in?

    Thank you, Scott.

    • That will go in the SPDIF plug to the left of the Thunderbolt.

  • Gary Ray

    #1 — Should there be 2 power sources for the ASUS Strix graphics card? Right now I have only plugged in the card. The very short manual indicates a “possible” for the wire plug-in.
    #2 — Do the 2 fans for the Nactua cooling turn in the opposite direction to the Phanteks fan on the box?
    #3 — Are there any Bios issues that are particularly important? I would just as soon push a button for the average “best”. In other words don’t fiddle with the Bios.
    #4 — The motherboard “panel” is missing plugs for the top 4 pins in sequence on the right. The bottom 5 pins on the right, only 4 pins are plugged, the third pin is missing. On the left side, 2 pins are in the top left and 2 pins in the bottom left pins. Is this proper?
    Thanks, again Scott. I think I am finished.

    • 1. The ASUS card only has one.
      2. That is just because of the orientation of the case fan vs the cooler fan. It’s fine.
      3. No, but you might want to update the BIOS.
      4. What appears to be missing pins is normal, you’ll see there is also no place for pins in those spots on the connectors that go into the aforementioned ports. Don’t overthink it, it’s all good.

  • secondguess

    Scott or anyone on this list who has already built the DIY 11 using the same components, can you comment on my previous question:
    – In the video of DIY, after securing the MB in the case, Scott seems to re-install the memory cards in two adjacent slots (see around the time mark 9:53), while they previously were positioned in alternating slots (A1 and B1, as per the MB instructions). So what is the correct position for 2 RAM cards?

    – also any thoughts about ASUS GTX970 vs. the EVGA card? Scott seemed to choose the EVGA because of reported coil noise in ASUS. But my impression is that reviews/comments in the Internet mention this noise in both cards.

    • For whatever reason I was getting an initialization error (which seemingly wasn’t related to the RAM, at least according to ASUS) with the RAM in the A1 and B1 slots which resolved itself after putting them in those two slots in the video,

      As for the GFX card, our EVGA has not experienced coil whine but it seems like it is in fact common across all of the 970 cards.

  • Jose Antonio Sarmento

    Hello, any suggestion for a build that handles Sony A7s XAVC S (hd and 4k) footage for around $3000 dollars?

  • Denver Video Production

    Followed your build and I’m getting random freezing when overclocked to 4700 Mhz. I took it back to defaults in the bios and now every time I shutdown I get a freeze before it powers off with a 05 Q-code on the board. I think I have a bad MB.

  • Eddie B

    Good build. I doubled the ram to 32. Performs well, even for 4k off-line with Vegas Pro. Easy overclocking with the ASUS Five-way optimizing software. There are plenty of useful YouTubes on how to set up the motherboard and do similar builds. ASUS motherboard support was very helpful, for initial ram problems – they even did a motherboard exchange, cause mine did not recognize all the ram. Set up with 3 monitors, the extra screen useful for tinkering with additional Vegas screens. Thanks, VideoGuys.

    • You are very welcome! Enjoy the machine and happy editing.

  • Gary Ray

    I am up and running. I also upgraded to 32.

    I see that there are new ASUS bios for this mother board. My bios is 2012. There have been two changes that might be useful or NOT. 2205 and 2401. However reading the changes seem meaningful. IF so, the version I have does not coincide with the Windows 7 information. Any suggestions here? Thanks to you, Gary and Videoguys.

  • Herbrata Moeljo

    Please review a DIY base on Dual Xeon Machine, since one that I plan to build (A Dual Xeon Quad core, only about $2,500.00 complete with 2 Inside HDD Storage)

    Here is the detail:
    MB SuperMicro X9DRG-QF (4 of PCIe 3.0 x16, 2 PCIe 3.0 x8 (one in x16) and 1 PCIe 2.0 x4 (in x8)
    $479.94
    http://www.amazon.com/NEW-RELEASE-SuperMicro-X9DRG-QF-Motherboard/dp/B007J5NSWQ

    PROC X2 E5-2603 v2 (Quad Core 10M Cache, 1.80 GHz)
    210.00 X2 = 420.00
    http://www.amazon.com/Intel-E5-2603-Quad-Core-Processor-BX80635E52603V2/dp/B00F291B7U

    CASING LIAN LI PC-A75 Black Aluminum HPTX / ATX FullTower Computer Case
    $169.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Description=hptx%20cases&Submit=ENE&IsNodeId=1&N=600029808

    PS EVGA SuperNOVA 1000 P2 80 PLUS PLATINUM, 1,000 watt Modular
    $199.99
    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=17-438-013

    X2 CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler

    $74.49 @ OutletPC = $150.00

    X2 Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (total 32GB)
    ($119.54 @ Amazon) = $240.00

    Storage: Crucial M550 256GB 2.5″ Solid State Drive (For O/S)
    $139.99 @ B&H

    Video Storage: 2X Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5″ 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($75.89 @ OutletPC)
    = $152.00

    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 970 4GB Superclocked ACX 2.0 Video Card
    $319.99 @ Newegg

    Optical Drive: LG WH16NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer
    $56.99 @ Micro Center

    Microsoft Windows 7 Pro64-Bit Operating System
    $139.99

    ASUS ThunerboltEX IIPCIeCard
    $70.00

    For Total $2,539.00

    I think it is quite a good balance rig as per perfornance and price ratio.

    Please give me your advise and suggest.

    Thanks for your attention.

  • Derek B

    I am about ready to order all the components for the DIY 11 build to run Sony Vegas Pro 13 as a “video enthusiast”, not a professional. I know that Windows 7 is still recommended by Videoguys. I am not a PC guru. Is it really necessary to stay with Win 7?

    It seems Windows 8.1 and soon to be Windows 10 is the future. You can’t even buy Win 7 at the brick and mortar stores. What are the compelling reasons to stick with Win 7 on this build? Why am I building a brand new computer with Win 7? This will also be my general use home computer, with emphasis on the horsepower for video editing. I will have “non-touch” monitors.

    • We are still recommending Win 7 for our customers, but Win 8.1 is approved by Sony, Adobe, Avid & Grass Valley for use with their NLEs. I would stay away from Win 10 until they have the 10.1 release or later.

      • Derek B

        At my office we have dedicated workstations for Autocad on Windows 7 and I can see the reason we don’t need Win 8.1 But for my home build DIY 11, I will go with Win 8.1 since it’s a multi purpose machine and I want to learn my way around the Win 8.1 environment using mouse and keyboard shortcuts. So if there is no harm for video editing performance, I will dive in with Win 8.1

        • jimatvideoguys

          Approved

  • SzM

    Hi Scott, what do you think about the Asus GTX980TI instead of the GTX970?

    • In all tests I’ve seen the GTX980TI beats the 970 so the decision comes down to price

      • SzM

        So you say, if I have the bucks for it, it’s worth the price?

        • For the prices I’m seeing… I don’t think you would see enough performance difference to justify 2x the cost. The 970 at $300-350 is our go to recommendation

  • Derek B

    I purchased the exact list of the DIY 11 components except a few minor things:

    – Got WiFi ac version.
    – increased RAM to 32Gb.
    – Win 8.1 instead of Win 7
    – SSD Corsair Force LS 240Gb.
    – HDD Two 2Tb WD Black instead of Thunderbolt 2 for now.

    I got the physical build done last night and successful POST first time to the EUFI screen. All seems good. Did not install Win 8.1 yet.

    My questions:
    1) The two fans on the Noctua NH-D14 are only 3 pin. The Z97 board CPU_FAN is 4 pins (as well as all the other fan headers are 4 pins). Why not buy the Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 which has 4 pins and supports PWM (and it’s $2 cheaper)? The ASUS advertising talks about how it’s software will optimize your system (which I don’t know anyting about yet). It says it works with either 3 pin or 4 pin fans. But does not say if one is better than the other.
    Should I return the NH-D14 and get the NH-D14 SE2011 with PWM?

    2) The 2 fans included in the Enthoo Pro case are also 3 pin. All the Chasis fan headers on the Z97 are 4 pin. So same question as above.

    Should I replace the case fans with 4 pin PWM fans? And bypass the Fan Distribution board in the case and plug directly to 4 pin Chasis fan headers?

    3) RAM speed reported as 1333 MHz. How do I get it to 1600 supported by the RAM? The ASUS spec says 1600 is supported without Overclocking (which I know nothing about). I was presuming it would run at 1600 plug and play.

    Otherwise, looking good and can’t wait to get software installed tonight.

    Thanks,
    Derek

  • Elvis Poldervaart

    The GTX970 does,t work with GPU Acceleration in Vegas Pro 13!

  • Eddie B

    Word of warning. One crazy quirk that drove me crazy for awhile, was an endless Windows 7 reboot and repair screen (Startup Repair Infinite Loop) sequence that prevented successful boot from the C: drive. It was like being in Groundhog day, repeated over and over again, but without the anything funny. Turns out if you reboot/restart or invoke motherboard overclock setup on your computer, with a camcorder or audio recorder left connected through the USB port (some USBs default to this), even if the recorder (mine is a Sony) is turned off, computer bootup fails. The computer looks for the drive plugged into that USB port to boot, and since there is no boot routine from your camcorder drive – boot-up fails! So remember to disconnect from the USB, before rebooting.

    • Sean R Wisner

      This reminds me of a brutal mistake I made several years ago, I wanted to reinstall windows XP on my mother in laws computer, because the grandkids had jacked it up so it was unbearably slow, so i took my USB hard drive to move the documents and preserve them.
      After taking the time to copy all of the pictures etc to my USB hard drive, I inserted the boot disk and went through the slow process of installing XP…
      Short story long, when I was done I found that I had in fact installed Windows XP onto my USB drive wiping it otherwise clean (losing many of my own pics & docs) and no changes were made to my mother in laws computer.

  • Darren George

    There are a couple of bugs I’ve come across during working with what I have that I would love assistance with smoothing out. Also, I want to upgrade, but can only afford one critical item, would love guidance with that also.

    Here’s my current setup
    Asus Z97-A motherboard
    Intel i7 4790K quad core
    FAN: ARCTIC Freezer 7 Pro Rev 2 – 150 Watt Multicompatible Low Noise CPU Cooler
    Asus GTX 760
    24GB RAM (Corsair Vengeance with Overclock to 3200 option)
    Operating System Drive – Crucial m550 128GB SSD (I did something dumb, and accidentally bought the mobile version of the card, had to get an adapter to get it back to standard SATA size, but it works great and is super fast)
    Internal Project Drive (This is what I work from) – Crucial M500 SSD 480GB
    Windows 8.1 PRO (unactivated, have to reinstall but just haven’t done it yet, considering Windows 10)
    Additional Storage – WD My Book DUO 8TB USB 3.0
    One monitor Asus PA248Q
    My CPU case has NO fans! So the side panels are off :-S

    Updated to latest BIOS already
    BUG: Dropped frames, computer doesn’t go to sleep

    What do you think could be upgraded for best performance improvement?

  • Darren George

    Amazon has them back in stock

  • basspig

    I’ve had no luck getting Premiere Pro to run smoothly on a Dual Xeon E5-2630 v3 with 128GB ECC RAM and a Titan X GPU, playing files with the MXF wrapper. Doesn’t matter the resolution (4K or HD), it stutters and drops 90-140 frames on first play and drops additional frames througout play (the frame dropping seems worse at HD and not as bad at 4K, ironically). CPU utilization in 4K is only 16% and RAM useage is around 36GB.
    I’ve tweaked the ASIO latency settings, tried upping the process priority for Premiere, and turned off all power saving, C1E processor states in the BIOS, as well as set Windows 7 to performance profile. Not any of these adjustments had one iota of improvement.
    Then I discovered something: if I use another NLE, playback is perfect and I can even edit multiple streams of 4K in multicam within DaVinci Resolve 12 beta.
    Also found that VLC Media Player, with the advanced menu settings for CODEC set to multiple threads, can play this footage with no effort and 2% CPU usage. XAVC-I at 60fps, 6% CPU and again, smooth playback with no apparent effort.
    So the problem comes back to Adobe Premiere. There are serious latency issues with the media core and the Adobe player.
    I found that I can scrub my way through a four 4K XAVC edit smoothly, but if I press the play button, it just freezes. Meanwhile, I can edit four UHD Prores 422 clips in multicamera with totally smooth play on all four camera views and on the 4K output monitor.

    The MXF wrapped files, regardless of bitrate and resolution, are the problem in Premiere. I found a thread on that matter and it seems this has been a much complained about problem dating back to CC 2014.

    • jimatvideoguys

      Approved

  • Tom McD

    Not to mess with success but I have one question. Since I already have a case and power supply and the graphics card would going to a Intel Core i7-5960X Haswell-E 8-Core upset your builds stability? Not sure if this would “un-balance” the system or practically would cost justify the performance gain? BTW great forum guys.

    • It won’t unbalance the system, but you might want to go with 32GB of RAM at that point.

      • prince terry

        Gary

        sorry mate, hv more questions for u….

        if i upgrade the cpu to a 6gen as oppose to 4gen as mentioned in your build which one wld u recommend and is it worth it for the $$$ and can i still use the same motherboard? also, if i go for a GTX980 is there anything i shld be looking for. i assume the RAM wld be the same..your advice pls. cheers

        • you need to make sure the CPU is supported by the motherboard. Many times the latest new chips are not supported in older otherboards

  • B Pete

    First … thanks for the great DIY info you’re doing here! I’m anxious to
    do a build and have a couple of questions though. 1st, since it’s been some
    months now, what about the new Windows 10 as the OS? 2nd and really my primary
    question is what about this build and working with 4K (lower end like Sony
    RX10-2 or Panasonic GH 4) files in Premiere or Resolve, is this system up to it
    or can you recommend some changes or additions? I see this board can support a
    max 32GB RAM. Is there another option that might let us add more as needed.

    Thanks

    • jimatvideoguys

      Approved

  • Bob

    Scott,

    I came across your page and I’m thinking about giving this a shot. Most of my work in graphics has to do with 3d renders and all adobe products. 1 question

    1) I’m not able to find the Z97 pro – only – ASUS Z97-PRO GAMER LGA 1150 Intel Z97 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard. Is this a comparable board? OR is there another board you might recomend?

    • any off the Asus Z97 family of motherboards is an excellent choice.

  • Miguel

    Hi VideoGuys,
    Just wanted to say thanks for putting these DIY guides together to help us all out here in NLE-land. We recently took much of your advice on our build…and then realized the 6th generation Intel CPU’s were out…so we decided that, although a build around the 4790 was still a great machine, why not start out with the newest? So we used your recommended Phantek Enthoo Pro Case…but instead put in an ASUS Z-170-A motherboard for the i7-6700k @ 4.0 Ghz chip. Added 32GB (4x8GB) of DDR4-2400 RAM…and used the XFX R9 390 Video Card with 8GB DDR5 RAM and 512-Bit ……AND used the SAMSUNG SM951 m.2 256GB SSD as our Boot Drive….and it is a FAST system!! (Cooling with the Hyper 212 EVO instead of the Noctua…)

    Again , just saying thanks…if you do a DIY based on the z170 chipset…this might be a good way to go!

    PS. Have great pics of our buidl, if interested…looks sharp!

  • prince terry

    Gary i hv a question…
    i know my system is well below par and out dated but i was wondering what parts should i upgrade first as i don’t hv the budget to upgrade at once.
    my current system is as follows;

    Windows7 64bit sp1
    AMD Phenom II x4 955 BE
    MSI 790FX-GD70 (MS-7577) MB
    Kingston Hyperx 8GB DDR3 @ 666MHz (9-9-9-24)
    Nvidia GeForce 670 GTX 2047MB
    Intel SSD 223GB W240A

    appreciate any advice, cheers

    • I wouldn’t invest much in this system. Save your money for a new build. The only upgrade I would advise is adding more RAM. Double up to 16GB

      • prince terry

        Gary
        sorry mate, another question for u…
        say i upgrade my whole rig… based on your DIY11 n i want to up the cpu to a 6th gen as appose to 4th gen as indicated in your spec, what i7 cpu wld u suggest also if i go for a GTX980 graphic card is there anything special i shld be looking for and lastly, any benefits with Asus x99 delux or the x97 pro will do jst as well. appreciate your time

  • Chris Chandler

    I have a HotRod DIY9 build I built myself and it has given me a lot of problems over the years. It blacks out every once and a while and says NVIDIA drivers are not responding. I have tried everything I could find on the web to solve this and for years it has been manageable, but still a nuisance. Lately it is happening more often and the operating system hangs to the point that after waiting 5-10 minutes I give up and reboot. In fact today I seem to get 10-20 into using my computer and a hangup seems to happen. I am wondering if I just need to scrap the old Quadro 4000 for something else? I am not sure what is freezing my mouse (I suspect the graphics card but dont know really) but I do know that I get a complete screen blackout multiple times a day. It is enough to make me want to pull my hair out. Do you have any recommendations on what I need to do? Should I scrap the Quadro 4000 and replace it with a ASUS GTX970 card? My board is the P9X79 WS I have 32 Gig of Ram Memory too. Should I upgrade to ASUS GTX970 Graphics Card since 4000 seems to be a trouble maker? Would it help or do I need to rebuild?

    • Chris Chandler

      Anybody have any idea? I’d like to get a GTX 970 graphics card if it would go well with my P9X79 WS motherboard.

    • I have the same exact issue. I built a Diy9 as well. This is my 2nd card that has gone, The first we built originally with the Quadro 4000. It had to get RMA after the same driver errors and black screens happened about 2 years in. We swapped it out for a GTX 770 a year plus later same issues. We are in the midst of RMA that card as well. The system runs good for a few months and then really always had a lot of stability issues. I went to buy a GTX970 put it in the CPU wouldn’t boot it kept throwing a Mobo Error Code. Took it out returned it, put in the old GTX770 booted right up. So I would assume we would have to flash the BIOS.

      To be honest we have lost so much time in trying to constantly stabilize this machine, I was going to buy a HP workstation but using Adobe Premiere from my research Premiere isn’t hugely multi threaded so the work station class Xeon chips are slower than a i7 OC. All of these headaches constantly have made me want to go back to OSX.

  • Torbjørn Anderson

    Hi Gary. Is it all about cuda cores in a graphic card? I build myselv a new workstation for editing. I’m using premiere pro CC. x99 pro motherboard, Intel Core i7-5820k and I have borrowed a graphic card from my son-in-law, a asus geforce gtx 770 with 1536 cuda cores. I can also recieve a card from my daily work. It’s a nvidia quadro k4000. This card has only 758 cuda cores. I have the inpression that you recomend quadro cards more than geforce cards. I Is it more to it than just cuda cores?
    Torbjorn Anderson

  • Bob Tyson

    Aloha Gang…got the 970 and the HX750i…(not like the one in the video)…the card has an 8 pin plug on top but all the pci marked cables have a 6+2. There is an extra cord that is an 8 but marked cpu. I assume I can use that ‘8 cpu’ for power the 970? Got most of you diy but subd an antec 1100v2 and samsung ssd. Waiting for some more fans etc to get here. Thanks for your time…..

  • Der Unflat

    Hej,

    I’m building a system for AVCHD, H.264. editing in premiere a lot of Lightroom and some Photoshop. I’m on a tight budget and I’ll use what I have and just invest a little money to make it work.

    Could you please tell me if it will actually work for editing?

    I got my brothers old computer. It’s the Medion P5350. I will use it’s power suppy, chassis and windows license. MBD is dead so I have to upgrade there.

    The specs:
    CPU: i5 2320
    GPU: Nvidia GeForce GT530
    SSD: 120 GB Intenso
    HDD: 250 GB Samsung
    External: 2x 500GB WD HDD
    RAM: 2x Patriot 8GB
    MBD: ASRock H61 Pro BTC

    Is that setup up balanced? Should I cut costs or invest a little more in any of the components?

    Ill take the CPU and HDD from the old PC. Ill just buy RAM, MBD and SSD. Total cost is 150-200$ at the moment.

  • Matt Hardy

    Any updates to components on this? Titan vis 980 TI? Any worth while Thunderbolt3 motherboards? Looking to build a DIY for Adobe Premiere Pro CC with a $2500 budget. Thanks!

  • arkstudios1

    Hi, looking to do a self build to run Livestream or vMix using SDI cameras for live production, I would be very grateful if you could confirm if the system I’m thinking of would be ok and balanced, as follows :-

    intel core i7 5930K extreme (6 x 3.5ghz) – turbo 6 x 3.7 ghz
    NVIDIA geforce GTX980
    windows 7 or 8 (i think 8 due to video capture card, but would prefer 7)
    decklink quad 2 (8x HD-SDI)
    corsair 32gb vengeance LPX 2666MHz (4x8gb)
    Gigabyte X99gaming 5(intel x99) 6xusb3/4xusb2

    Spent hours trying to work out the best system (speed and performance, reliability), so hope it will be ok, if not would appreciate your feedback. Many thank in advance.

    • jimatvideoguys

      That machine looks very good however I would not recommend Windows8. You want to either stay with Win7 Pro or go to Windows 10 if you can get all the drivers and software support you need there.